Pete Musico, 42, of Munith, sits on camera listening as the judge and attorneys discuss his case during a probable cause conference Friday via Zoom at Jackson County's 12th District Court.

A Jackson County judge on Friday delayed a bond hearing until next week for a man who officials say helped found a group now suspected of domestic terrorism.

Pete Musico, 42, of Munith, closed his eyes and rocked back and forth slightly while the judge discussed the choice during a probable cause conference Friday via Zoom at Jackson County’s 12th District Court.

He sat silently in an orange jumpsuit during most of the brief hearing, but frowned and shook his head “no” as a state official described the violent nature of the case.

Musico’s attorney, Kareem Johnson, urged Judge Michael Klaeren to immediately consider his motion to reduce Musico’s $10 million bond, calling it unreasonable.

Pete Musico, 42, of Munith, right, listens as his public defender, Kareem Johnson, left discusses his case during a probable cause conference Friday via Zoom at Jackson County's 12th District Court.

Klaeren, however, put off the bond hearing until Oct. 23 so the Attorney General’s office has time to prepare for the hearing. He said because the motion was made in writing, the state should have time to respond in like. 

Musico remains in custody at a county jail.

While Friday’s hearing was brief, there were new details that shed light on the case’s complexity.

Assistant Attorney Gregory Townsend said Musico’s case involves 1,100 federal police reports, 84 recordings that last 150 hours, 5,000 pages of his Facebook account and other records.

“We will adequately demonstrate to the court the violent nature of this defendant,” Townsend said.

Given the complexity, Klaeren also pushed back the date of Musico’s probable cause conference until Dec. 4

Pete Musico, 42, of Munith, bottom right, sits on camera listening as his public defender, Kareem Johnson, bottom left discusses his case with Judge Michael Klaeren, top left, and Sunita Doddamani, middle and Gregory Townsend of the Michigan Attorney General's Office during a probable cause conference Friday via Zoom at Jackson County's 12th District Court.

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Officials believe Musico was a founding member of the so-called Wolverine Watchmen “militia,” according to court records. He is one of 14 men tied to the group now charged in connection to a plot to kidnap Gov. Gretchen Whitmer

He and co-defendant Joseph Morrison, 26, are said to have lived together at a Munith property that was used for tactical training, used their group to recruit, made terrorist threats and carried firearms while providing support to a terrorist, court records show.  

Morrison also was slated for a probable cause conference Friday, but the case was adjourned, his attorney George Lyons said Thursday. A new date was not set.

Lyons would not say much about his client.

“Only that he has a lovely wife and a beautiful 2-year-old daughter,” he said, later adding: “Who he truly misses tremendously.”

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Morrison was the Watchmen’s “Commander” and known by the online moniker “Boogaloo Bunyan,” state officials said in a court affidavit.

“Boogaloo” refers to a violent uprising against the government or a politically motivated civil war, officials said, and civil war was the goal.  

To that end, the group also discussed plans to attack the state Capitol and target police officers at their homes, according to state officials.

Pete Musico, 42, of Munith, sits on camera listening as the judge and attorneys discuss his case during a probable cause conference Friday via Zoom at Jackson County's 12th District Court.

Six of the 13 are charged at the federal level with conspiracy to commit kidnapping. Musico, Morrison and six others have cases levied at the state level, with the Munith pair facing charges of threat of terrorism, gang membership, providing material support for  terrorist act, and carrying a firearm during the commission of a felony.

Except for the weapons charge, each count is punishable by up to 20 years in prison upon conviction. The weapons charge is punishable by two years in prison upon conviction for a first offense.